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Weekly Update Bulletin On-Line.........  
In The News, Editorials, and Readers Write In (with our answers to Questions)

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PANAMA UPDATE:  It would seem there is quite a bit of confusion and debate regarding the new tax changes passed recently in Panama, and in specific exactly how these new tax changes will effect retirees and other foreign residents living in Panama (with respect to what appears to be a new initiative for taxation on world-wide income).  Some local accountants and lawyers in Panama have now said that they interpret this new tax regulation as saying that foreign source pension income coming from funds earned outside of Panama and placed in a pension plan from abroad will still be tax exempt or not effected.  However, it has also been clarified or stated that this would in theory ONLY apply to pension money, such as Social Security and or a work related pension plan.  So, any other investment income coming from bank accounts, brokerage accounts, real estate rental income, etc. domiciled outside of Panama would seemingly now be taxable for residents living inside of Panama.  One thing is for sure - stay tuned for more debate and confusion as the tax train continues to roll down the tracks in terms of tax collection initiatives for foreign retirees living in Panama.
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DOMINICAN REPUBLIC UPDATE:  We have recently completed a very detailed 2005 Question and Answer section regarding the Dominican Republic, which you can view by following the link below.  We did not reprint it here, because it is quite long.  However topics include current (2005) information regarding the economy, banking, real estate, cost of living, crime and safety, plus more.  However to offer some general information about crime and safety, which is one topic in particular whereby there seems to be a great deal of misinformation, please see the following:
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Read Complete Article Here:
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http://www.dominicanrepublicpage.com/Questions_2005.html
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SOME STATISTICS REGARDING THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC IN COMPARISON TO OTHER COUNTRIES:
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The most recent statistics for the number of people incarcerated (in jail) for every 100,000 inhabitants in the following countries is as follows:
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714  - UNITED STATES (USA), 532  - BERMUDA, 487  - CUBA, 386  - PUERTO RICO, 354  - PANAMA, 182  - MEXICO, 177  - COSTA RICA, 157  - DOMINICANREPUBLIC, 142  - ENGLAND, 116  - CANADA, 100  - NICARAGUA,  91  - FRANCE, 83  - VENEZUELA,  75  - SWEDEN
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Source of Information:
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http://www.kcl.ac.uk/depsta/rel/icps/worldbrief/world_brief.html
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EDITORS NOTE:  And it is official, the US wins again with .007 percent of the entire US population behind bars, which is one of the highest rates in the world.  Based on these findings we can possibly conclude that:  There are more criminals in the Unites States on average than in almost any other place on earth.  There are a very high number of criminals in Bermuda - with respect to the amount of crooks in the Dominican Republic.  There are actually less people in jail, per capita, in Communist Cuba, than in the United States.  There are more crooks in Puerto Rica or Mexico, on a per capita basis than the Dominican Republic.  In conclusion, many people have cited rumors or comments that the Dominican Republic is a more dangerous place to visit (in terms of criminality) than somewhere else.  However, these statistics would lend one to believe that the US is actually the most crime-ridden country on the planet.  Very interesting, but there is more:
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Since the definition of HOMICIDE (also known as Murder) is similar in most countries, absolute comparisons of rates are possible (murder is murder in any language, although the Pan American Health Organization does include murder AND injuries purposely inflicted by another person as part of its statistics).  From the most recently available statistics, the average rate (the number of homicides per 100,000 population) in the following countries on a national level is as follows:
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24.8  - US VIRGIN ISLANDS, 22.1  - RUSSIA, 18.8  - PUERTO RICO, 16.2  - BAHAMAS, 13.5  - PANAMA, 11.3  - MEXICO, 10.6  - UK VIRGIN ISLANDS (BVI), 10.6  - ESTONIA, 10.3  - BELIZE, 9.7  - DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, 9.6  - BARBADOS, 6.7  - COSTA RICA, 6.5  - UNITED STATES, 5.8  - CUBA, 2.9  - FINLAND, 1.5  - CANADA
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Sources: Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), International Comparisons of Criminal Justice Statistics 2001-Home Office Bulletin 12/03
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http://www.paho.org/english/sha/coredata/
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EDITORS NOTES:  Oh those Canadians - must be something in that Molson Beer that keeps them all calm and collected, eh.  In any event, it would seem that in comparison to visiting the Dominican Republic versus some other places:  You are twice as likely to be murdered in Puerto Rico than you are in the Dominican Republic, you are at higher risk to be murdered in the Bahamas than in the DR, and incredibly enough - you are 3 times more likely to be murdered in the US Virgin Islands.  Who knew?  The guy from the accounting department at work who you usually chat with at the water cooler told you he heard from the neighbor of his cousin (who heard from his proctologist) that the Dominican Republic was a dangerous place and that you are better off going to Puerto Rico or the US Virgin Islands.  Hmmm, do not forget to pack your bulletproof vest. 
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But all these numbers started me thinking.  I mean, these are all places outside of the continental United States, so why not just stay inside the US and never leave?  You will be safe there, right?  Just how bad is it really in the US, with a national average of only 5.8 (which is more than double the murder rate in the EU, but let us not fuss about minor details as these)?  Here are some numbers by US city - metropolitan areas in alphabetical order (murders per 100,000):
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Albuquerque, New Mexico-8.1, Atlanta, Georgia-8.7, Augusta, Georgia-9.0, Baltimore, Maryland-13.0, Birmingham, Alabama-10.5, Detroit, Michigan-19.5, Fairbanks, Alaska                   12.3, Florence, South Carolina-11.2, New Orleans, Louisiana-25.5, Phoenix, Arizona                      9.2, Pine Bluff, Arkansas-16.9, Richmond, Virginia-13.6, Rocky Mount, North Carolina 11.0, Saginaw, Michigan-9.5, Savannah, Georgia-11.8, Shreveport. Louisiana-14.5, Sumter, South Carolina-11.3, Tucson, Arizona-8.3, Tulsa, Oklahoma-8.6, Victoria, Texas-25.4, Vineland, New Jeresey-11.4, Virginia Beach, Virginia-8.0, Washington, D.C.-11.0
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Source:  http://www.cjgsu.net/initiatives/HomRates-2004-05-14.htm
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EDITORS NOTES - There are some cities that one might expect to be high on the list.  For example, we have heard the media tell us in the past that Washington, D.C. was the murder capital of the US (it is also the nations capital, but that is another matter) and that the murder rate was high in Detroit and other large US cities.  But what in the world is going on over there in Virginia?  The state slogan used to be Virginia is for Lovers.  What is it now?  Sally has got a Gun?  And what about Arkansas - the home state of Bill and Hillary Clinton?  Maybe they moved to New York to get away from the crime down there?  Pine Bluff, Arkansas is almost as dangerous as Puerto Rico.  Victoria, Texas almost ties with New Orleans for top honors.  Where is Victoria - is that anywhere near Waco?  Anyway, as the summer time in the US approaches and people start planning vacations, just be careful out there.  Oh, and stay away from New Orleans - it's a killer city - literally.
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AMERICA: LOVE IT OR LEAVE IT
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Guess what?  A great many people are choosing to leave it.  Outsourcing your base of operations (moving) is not just for corporate America any more, as the middle class are finding out for themselves.  We have talked about this trend quite a bit in the past, but probably for the first time, it has been picked up or noticed by the mainstream media.  So, what does that tell you?  Well, for one thing, the media just like politicians are usually reactive rather than proactive.  Meaning, attention or notice is given after the fact, after something has happened, after the ball is in motion so to speak.  This being the case, we can assume two things from this.  Number one, this is a new trend already well in motion (and we tend to think it will certainly continue).  Number two, now that the politicians have noticed, expect to see continued draconian measures to stop the flow.  After all, it is fine and dandy for corporations to move jobs and themselves abroad, but we cannot have all those juicy middle class taxpayers leaving too, now can we?  So, as we also predicted in the past as well, continue to see new regulations and new attention paid to money transfers, banking issues, tax issues, maybe even second citizenship issues, etc. as it relates to expatriates, investments abroad, and or monies being moved outside of the US.  The following is a collection of news stories all related to this trend and related issues.
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IN THE NEWS:
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RUNNING AWAY TO RETIRE - By Linda Stern - Newsweek, March 14, 2005 Issue
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After a lifetime in Minnesota, Randy and Rhonda Berg turned their backs on frigid winters, work and the high cost of living in the United States. They sold everything and retired to Costa Rica in 2002, enticed by reports of cheap real estate and a laid-back lifestyle. The first week was an eye-opener, says Randy, 58, describing balky real-estate agents, an Internet-touted house that was an absolute disaster and the urge to head back home. They stuck it out, and now he and Rhonda, 48, have the retirement lifestyle of their dreams, complete with a sprawling mountaintop property, a custom-built home and household help, all for less than $2,000 a month.  There isn't anything that would entice me to move back, says Randy.  The Bergs are part of a trend that demographers say will only increase as baby boomers start cashing their Social Security checks: Americans retiring to other countries where the prices are low and the living is easy.
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http://msnbc.msn.com/id/7102314/site/newsweek/
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BACK HOME, EXPATRIATE FINDS US MIRED IN FEAR - By Michael Dorgan, February 27, 2005 - Mercury News
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As my flight from Beijing to San Francisco readied for takeoff, I felt both reluctant to leave China and eager to return to the United States.  But as the big Boeing taxied down the runway on that lead-gray afternoon in December, I felt ready to go home. What I was not ready for were the changes that had taken place in America since I had left.  Considering the nature of the Sept. 11 disaster, improved airport security was required. But as I waited in line to clear Customs, I wondered how the scowls and 9mm semiautomatics would protect America.  It was a show of force that looked to me like a display of fear - the kind of response a nation makes when it's frightened and wants to do something but doesn't know quite what to do.  Already some Americans have been stripped of their most basic rights because of unproven suspicions they aided terrorists. I wondered how many others would end up on the wrong side of the Patriot Act and other security legislation if there is another attack.  I soon would learn that the threat from Islamist fanatics is not the only thing Americans fear these days. I can't count the conversations I've had in recent weeks with people worried about losing health care coverage, Social Security benefits, pensions or jobs.  Others express fears less concrete but no less deeply felt. There is a broad unease about the future -- about the abyss that has opened between the haves and have-nots, about the hollowing out of America's economy, about the rapid erosion of America's influence and standing in the world.
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http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/editorial/11005900.htm
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TAX HAVENS FOR THE RICH - By Linda Leatherdale, Toronto Sun - March 26, 2005
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No kidding. Tax Freedom Day last year fell on June 28, meaning all the money earned by average families in the first six months of the year goes to pay total taxes, for a tax rate of 48.9%. For corporations, who pay only 25% of Canada's income tax burden, with 75% paid by individuals, Tax Freedom Day falls in August, when total taxes are added up.  Now, here's one way to lessen the blow.  Persons who sever all ties to Canada by giving up a driver's licence, health cards, a principal residence and who live a majority of the time in another country, CAN AVOID PAYING TAXES IN CANADA unless the income is earned here, say tax officials.  Canada has tax treaties with countries such as Switzerland, Austria (where Stronach owns a 400-year-old castle), the Cayman Islands, Bermuda and Barbados.  Meanwhile, Canadians have been stashing increasing amounts of money in tax havens, with the amount of Canadian-owned assets held in offshore financial centres in 2003 at a whopping $88 billion.
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http://www.canoe.ca/NewsStand/EdmontonSun/Business/2005/03/
26/972890-sun.html

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EDITORS NOTE:  Not only are the newspapers reporting on it, they are actually telling you how to do it - very legally of course (and why not).
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STRUCTURING YOUR BUSINESS OFFSHORE - by Richard Colburn, Bangkok Post, March 28, 2005
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Many multinational companies make use of offshore companies as part of their operational and financial planning, but did you know that almost any business that produces and sells in different countries can benefit from offshore structuring?  The business factor - If you are an expatriate running a business here in Thailand, the chances are that at least some, if not all of your customers, are located elsewhere.  As a foreigner, you are probably operating through a Thai company. You may be supplying your overseas customers directly from your Thai company. In this case, you only have to deal with paperwork in Thailand and your tax liability is confined to Thai taxes. Alternatively, you may have set up an overseas company where your customers live, in which case your Thai company will invoice the overseas company for the value of goods exported from Thailand. This results in paperwork at both ends of the supply chain as well as tax liabilities in two countries.  Whether you operate a single local company or through a combination of a local and overseas company, there are legitimate steps that can be taken to mitigate your overall tax bill. Central to such a strategy is an intermediary offshore company.  In a perfect world, the local production company would invoice the offshore company at an artificially low price resulting in a nil local tax liability. The offshore intermediary company would then invoice the overseas distribution company at an artificially high price resulting in a nil tax liability in the overseas jurisdiction.  Unfortunately, tax authorities in most countries are aware of this particular loophole and have put in place tax evasion rules. These "transfer pricing" rules seek to impose minimum levels of profitability. Although this prevents outright tax evasion, there is usually still scope for significant tax savings if the right offshore structure and pricing system are put in place.  The offshore factor - Using an offshore company in your business structure provides benefits far beyond reducing your tax bill. First, you can accumulate funds in a tax-free jurisdiction. Free from capital controls and other restrictions, the money so accumulated can be used for whatever you want and whenever you need it. Even if the money just sits in a bank account, you will at least avoid tax on the interest.
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http://www.bangkokpost.com/Yourmoney/28Mar2005_money10.php
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THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK:
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Never mind that the Lou Dobbs nightly television program has reported that the number of illegal aliens entering the United States (mostly Mexicans) each year has almost doubled to 750,000.  Never mind that the Bank of America boasts that they are opening 700 new bank accounts PER DAY for illegal Mexican aliens (legal identification?  Who needs legal identification?).  In fact, a spokeswoman for the bank states it is not the banks job to enforce or be involved with immigration matters.  However, just YOU try and open a bank account either in the US or elsewhere with some half-baked identification card that looks like it came out of a fruit loops cereal box.  Heck, many banks and investment firms in Europe and elsewhere will no longer open accounts for Americans (who usually do have very real and very legitimate identification - and that in most cases I can imagine entered such countries very legally).
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In any event, the fact remains while the illegal aliens are moving in, the impetus is on to stop the currently very legal middle class residents already there from leaving - or in the least, leaving with their money.  In our opinion, this may take a number of different forms and avenues, starting with a possible restriction and or extra tax on money transfers outside of the country, to putting tremendous pressures on smaller countries with very low or no income taxes at the moment - to start taxing.  Case in point, the very recent and very shocking news that Panama wants to start taxing residents on worldwide income.  Now, Antigua, a nation with previous advantageous tax and banking regimes has now too passed a new law allowing for an income tax (see news below).
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ANTIGUA'S PARLIAMENT PASSES TAX LAW
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MAR. 25, 2005  - The Antiguan parliament passed a tax law that paves the way for residents to pay personal income taxes for the first time in nearly 30 years.  The United Progressive Party government said it was forced to reintroduce the tax to deal with the deficit left by the former Antigua Labour Party administration, which abolished income tax in 1976.  The tax would come into effect on April 15, with proposed rates ranging from 10 to 25 percent on incomes about a minimum level.  Since 1976, the salaries of Antiguans and Barbudans have gone untaxed, except for medical, social security and education dues.
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http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D8923CC01.htm?
campaign_id=apn_home_down

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EDITORS COMMENTS:  As we stated earlier, the very nature of news is that is a report of something that already happened.  But aside from that, the specific focus of the media in the US and Canada on expatriation, and specifically assets that citizens of those nations have moved abroad (or offshore if you like), leads us to believe that the stage is being set for more to come.  Even the well-read and well-traveled international investment guru, Mr. Doug Casey, has taken notice and made very similar comments as well in some of his recent articles.
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What does this all add up to?  While it can sometimes be difficult to precisely predict the future, there are a number of events and circumstances that one might say would indicate the writing on the wall, so to speak.  In other words, it does seem that the large exodus of middle class North Americans has been noticed.  One would hope and think that this would prompt politicians to ask the questions:  Why are all these people leaving?  What can we do to motivate them to stay?  What can we do better so our own citizens do NOT want to leave?  But alas, this is not usually what happens.  Instead, it is often the case that a new tax is imposed, a new restriction, and or a new law is put into place to hold citizens and the assets of these people - against their will.  Meaning, instead of trying to fix the problem or the reasons why people are leaving, they usually try to somehow incarcerate those citizens (or incarcerate the money) rather than fix the true problem.  So, we tend to believe, as we have stated many times before, the window may be slowly closing.  As the North American news media starts to whip up anger and support for an anti-expatriate sentiment, look out for politicians to start following suit.  Here are some very recent news stories:
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OFFSHORE TAX HAVENS MORE POPULAR THAN EVER - By Paul Waldie, Toronto Globe and Mail, March 15 - 2005
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Canadian companies are stashing more money into offshore tax havens than ever, a study indicates.  Between 1990 and 2003, the amount of money Canadian corporations put into tax havens, mainly in the Caribbean, soared to $88-billion from $11-billion, according to a study by Statistics Canada.  Direct investments in these countries increased 18 per cent annually on average. That compared with an annual increase of 8 per cent for investments in the United States and 14 per cent annually for investments in other countries. Tax haven countries "accounted for more than one-fifth of all Canadian direct investment abroad in 2003, double the proportion 13 years earlier," the study said. It added that of the $88-billion, $53-billion ended up in offshore banks.
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http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/
20050315/ROFFSH15/TPBusiness/Canadian

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SUPER RICH HIDE TRILLIONS OFFSHORE - By Nick Mathiason
Sunday March 27, 2005 - Guardian (London, UK)
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The world's richest individuals have placed $11.5 trillion of assets in offshore havens, mainly as a tax avoidance measure. The shock new figure - 10 times Britain's GDP - is contained in the most authoritative study of the wealth held in offshore accounts ever conducted.  The study, by Tax Justice Network, a group of accountants and economists concerned at the escalating wealth held in offshore locations, shows that the world's high-net-worth individuals earn $860 billion each year from their assets.  But there is growing alarm among regulators and campaigners because exchequers worldwide are missing out on at least $255bn of tax each year. Governments appear unable, or unwilling, to prevent the rich employing aggressive strategies to minimize their tax liabilities.  The OECD this weekend confirmed that international tax avoidance is a growing problem that troubles governments not just of rich countries, but middle-income ones as well.
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http://politics.guardian.co.uk/economics/story/0,11268,1446127,00.html
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EDITORS NOTES:  The news article from Canada would suggest there is about 88 Billion Dollars worth of Canadian owned funds offshore.  The most recent national GDP figures for 2005 estimate a GDP of almost 30 Billion Dollars (Canadian Dollars), which is equal to roughly US$25 Billion Dollars.  If so, that equates to an amount of money offshore (in regards to Canadians alone) that adds up to almost 4 times the national Gross Domestic Product of Canada.  The news article from the Guardian in the UK tops that one better, laying claims that British Citizens have a total of 10 times the annual Gross Domestic Product of Great Britain offshore.  Can you believe it? Do you believe it?
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While there certainly are a large number of people looking to take themselves and their money elsewhere, it is not the super wealthy but rather the middle class.  That being said - are these claims accurate or are they mentioned to create an aura of anger and distain on the part of the general population?  Are the politicians preparing a new excuse to stop the transfer of assets (and maybe you too) abroad?  Are the seeds being planted?  Where is all this money?  Can it really be true that an amount of money equal to four times the national gross domestic product of Canada is in the Bahamas and the Cayman Islands?  If so, why is the murder rate so high in the Bahamas?  Are the Bahamians fighting over all that Canadian money? 
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Stay tuned at this new momentum unfolds politically and otherwise.  One thing is for sure though - the illegal Mexicans still seem to be coming over the border and banks like the Bank of America are gladly opening accounts for them.  However, the real question is:  Are we going to see the day when you, a legal tax-paying citizen, will not be allowed to leave your own country (or take your own money out)?  Perhaps the old boy scout motto applies:  Be Prepared.
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READERS WRITE IN:
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Dear John: I am a great believer in personal responsibility and personal freedom (much like our for father's in the United Stated of America).  Is there anywhere I can find a complete aggregation of the laws of the Dominican Republic, Rights, Freedoms, Lack thereof...relative to the U.S.A.?  The worst nightmare would be to move all my money into a place that has more red tape and laws against our God given by greaten and then find our that they are as restrictive as our country!  I am a Christian and with all my heart believe that the earth has been given to us to use as free men and woman.   That includes the fruits of our labor!  Should a man work 7 months out of a year for a government?  Indentured servitude was against the law in this country many years ago, however 7 months is about as close as it gets without calling it that!!!  Would you not agree?  Signed - A Man Looking For Freedom.
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EDITORS REPLY:  It is interesting to take note that we all in theory are sovereign individuals.  This means, just as the authors of the US declaration of independence had alluded, one is not property of a government but rather a member.  This being the case, does membership have it privileges?  I do not know, only you as an intelligent individual person can decide that in terms of yourself.  However, in the least, one is able to renounce membership and join another club - can they not?  One can choose to associate with and live in whatever nation, and under whatever kind of government they wish.  This is what in effect the authors of the American Declaration of Independence were saying.  And, what was true then, is just as true today.  You do have a choice, and it is your God given right to relocate (along with your legally earned assets) should you wish to do so.
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There is quite a bit of information on-line, but I would wager to guess, that it is going to be very difficult to find exactly what you are looking for.  Probably it is going to the case that you can glean from a number of different sources the types of information that you want.  However, I can only generally say that it many respects, the Dominican Republic is very libertarian (perhaps more by accident than by design).  In effect, this means much less government intervention and regulation in the lives of its citizens than the so-called most-free nation on earth.  Some people do think more government control is a good thing.  Some people even think the general population needs some overlord telling them what to do, and when (to protect the people from themselves, or so the thinking goes).  I am not one of them, and why I would choose to live in a country like the Dominican Republic.  Also, I will leave you with one observation, after leaving a few years in each place (the US and the Dominican Republic).  In the United States, I would say the people are afraid of the government.  In the Dominican Republic, the government is afraid of the people.  Which is better for a democracy? 
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Another Reader Writes:
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Hello, John - Your recent advisory that Panama is now able to tax offshore pensions (after an $800 per month exemption) has ruined my day.  I was ready to go down there in April and buy some land, but now am hesitating.  I e-mailed the American Chamber of Commerce for further clarification and, although they gave me the typical disclaimer that they are not tax advisors and I should consult one, they implied that you were wrong.  Now, obviously, they are not working from much detail because I didn't give them much; I wrote pretty much what I wrote above.  Can you expand on the new law or send me somewhere where I may study it a bit more?
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EDITORS REPLY:  Well, there is some information at the start of this newsletter, so I will not repeat it again.  However, there does seem to be quite a bit of controversy and discussion over this topic, which leads me to believe that even tax professionals in Panama are in disagreement over what the implications will be.  And, if they are in such disagreement, then what does that mean for the rest of us?
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In any event, I think this and the recent changes in Antigua highlight the fact that one must always be on guard and prepared for whatever changes come down the road.  As we have said many times before, no country is perfect and also, it is very true that things change.  If you think about what has gone on before in the US with IRA accounts (remember those?) - as just one example.  First they said you could contribute US$2,000 per year and take a full tax deduction for it.  Then they said you could only take a tax deduction if you earned less than a certain amount of income.  What is the point?  Politicians give and politicians take away.  Always be prepared with a well-rounded action plan.  No one really wants to have to pack up and move somewhere else, but maybe that is what you need to do sometimes.  The politicians are betting that you are either too lazy or too emotionally attached to want to do that.  But, you have to ask yourself: If I like living in country ABC and I do not mind paying 20% of my income in tax to the government (for what I am getting in return), it is still worth it at 50%?  How about 60%?  All other things being equal (quality of life, etc.) is country XYZ just as good of a place to live, AND by paying zero income tax or only 15% - is it an all around better deal for me?  This really is the issue.  Is Panama or Antigua a worthwhile place to reside should the government now decide to take x percent of your income (whereas they did not do so before)?
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Two things are usually the enemy of personal wealth and the capacity to live a decent lifestyle.  One is inflation (or really the devaluation of the national currency) and second is often enough, taxes.  Taxes are a necessary evil and funds have to be available to pay for certain government services and activities.  No one is that foolish, I believe, to think that it is possible to live in any country without contributing.  But how much is enough?  Many government already collect various use taxes (sales tax every time to buy something), gasoline tax, etc., etc.  So it is not as if you are not paying any taxes at all at the moment.  You are paying taxes every single day.  Every time you go to the store, every time you fill up your gas tank, every time you use a toll road or bridge, etc.  The question then becomes - how much is enough or what is your cost to live in x country in terms of taxes collected and what the government is giving back in return?  It is worth it?
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The information has been compiled and provided by John Schroder of Ascot Advisory Services.  Ascot Advisory assists clients with the formation of Panama Foundations and Offshore Company Formation, offshore banking introductions, Residency Services and other related services.  For more information:
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Telephone 809-334-5387 or 809-756-1917 
Email: info@ascotadvisory.com